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Cherry Fruit Facts Page Information
Availability by variety
Cherries Cherry, the common name for several related trees, and for the edible fruit of some species. The genus containing cherry trees also includes plums, peaches, almonds, and apricots. Because many of these plants have been cultivated for thousands of years and widely hybridized, the classification is complex.

The ancestors of most of the modern cultivated varieties of cherry are probably the sweet, or dessert, cherry and the sour, or pie, cherry. The sweet cherry tree is frequently planted for its fruit and for its beauty when in flower, and also for its value as a timber tree. It grows rapidly and has strong, close-grained wood, suitable for use by cabinetmakers, turners, and musical-instrument makers. Double varieties of both species are also grown.

Cherries are grown in many parts of the United States. Sweet cherries, more difficult to grow, are cultivated mainly in California, and sour cherries are common in the East. Some species with inferior fruit are cultivated especially for their flowers. Most notable of these are the Oriental cherry and the Nanking cherry. Thousands of trees of these species, presented by Japan to the United States in 1912, have been planted in Washington, D.C., around the Potomac Basin, where the cherry blossoms attract considerable attention each year in April.

How to Store:
Cherries do not ripen after harvest. They are very perishable, so refrigerate them immediately after purchase. Cherries can be kept fresh in the refrigerator for up to two days.

Nutritional Facts:
· Fat-free
· Saturated fat-free
· Sodium-free
· Cholesterol-free
· A good source of fiber

Detailed nutritional informatin can be found by searching the USDA Nutritional Database . Enter "Cherry" (no quotes) as the keyword and select the link and report of interest.

Scientific classification:
Cherry trees belong to the family Rosaceae. The sweet, or dessert, cherry is classified as Prunus avium.